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Nice News

Your up to the minute source for news in the fast moving world of tea and sit downs.

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Nuclear war could have led to weak tea

Monday 5 May 2008 Reporter: Nicey
In Cold War documents just released from the National Archive it transpires that those tasked with planning and forecasting for aftermath of an all out nuclear strike on 1950s Britain were concerned about the lack of tea. Whitehall officials thought that on the whole the UK agency for the stockpiling and distribution of food could ''with difficulty" cope "with a few A Bombs".
However, the detailed projections for the supply of tea were for disturbingly low levels of only one ounce per person per week. Half of the WWII ration and only a quarter of the amount considered as normal. Tea was seen as a vital morale boosting aid to the nation, and its no surprise the planners were still preoccupied with it only ten years after the end of WWII. At the start of WWI when supply ships were sunk by U Boats the government took it upon itself to ensure the nations tea supply taking over its importation and controlling its price. Just two days after WWII broke out the government ordered all tea stocks to be dispersed from London to safer warehouses out side of the capital in case of bombing. Those who had particularly thirsty jobs crucial to the war effort such as steel workers or firemen got a bigger ration.