Mission Statement
About our book

Buy our book as
Classy Hardback

Cuddly Paperback
Mailing list
Biscuit of the week
Club Milk
Your feedback
Pauline Wilson
Search feedback
The Wife says
Fig Fest
Biscuit quiz
Your Reviews
Missing in action
What the polls said
Giant Bee
Underpant toast
Apocalypse Bunny
Giant Marmots
The Duck
We are hosted by Precedence Technologies Internet Services
In Association with

Your Views

Keep your e-mails pouring in, it's good to know that there are lots of you out there with views and opinions.

To help you work out what is what, are now little icons to help you see biscuit related themes. And now you can see at a glance which are the most contested subjects via this graph (requires Flash 6.0 plugin).

Please keep your mails coming in to

If you like, you can use this search thingy to find stuff that matches with any of the icons you pick, or use the fantastic free text search, Yay!
Chocolate Cake Fruit Pink Wafers World of Biscuits The French Cork Hat - Australia Kiwi - Kiwis
Rocket Science Jammie Dodger Fig rolls Jam Smells like biscuits Jaffa cakes Biscuit tin Tea
Seek you the Grail Cheese please Canada Personal mug Superstitions Holidays Vending machines Tea cosy
Dunking Butter Aeroplanes Kettles Toast Picnics Spoons Weapons
Custard Tea in the Movies Ireland Rest In Peace Japanese Black Thunder
Type some key words here to search the feedback section

Your e-Mails

Keith O'Kane
Nicey replies: Kieth,

A toast icon is way overdue now.

Kate Allen
Nicey replies: Well, yes but we still turn it over when its made under the grill other wise it would be all steamy and damp on one side which would be not good at all. We only just got a toaster a few weeks back when we relocated the HQ as we were going to be with out the gas cooker for a few days. Otherwise we make it under the grill.

Wifey says - Actually, when I was a small child in Ireland I sometimes had one-sided toast when I couldn't be bothered to wait for the toast to toast on both sides under our very slow electric grill. I'd butter the un-cooked side, the result was, as Nicey says, a bit damp and not very nice at all.

Double sided grilling is by far the better option.

Helen Rees
Nicey replies: Morning,

I'd always assumed that Sting was projecting some weird Geordie Toast making practice on to the rest of England. Maybe his toaster is knakered. He's got a lot to answer for as many Americans now use that song as their stereotypical cultural summing up of the UK having finally ditched Mary Poppins, I know I have the emails.

As for that article, I remember going on a school trip to the British Tissues factory in Maestyg, and seeing various sorts of loo rolls being built. The same stuff was going into Dixel and Maid Marion (another corner shop brand). It also appeared to be the place where they make that pink toilet tissue with the little pictures of roses on it, which always seems to be the stuff people resort to when taken short in laybys. I think we all got a four pack of loo rolls to take home, and I remember Nanny Nicey was thrilled with it.

Keith O'Kane
CakeFruitJamTeaCheese please
Nicey replies: Kieth,

Our mate Nick Parker wrote a splendid book on toast, he also ran the London marathon last Sunday.

Of course Toast falls within the gamut of tea and sitting down activity. Wifey likes tea before, during and after Toast in the morning. Wifey sticks rigidly to Marmite or cheese. I like Bovril, Marmalade, sometimes a spot of jam occasionally Peanut Butter with sweet pickle or fresh ground black pepper. A spot of Heinz Tomato Ketchup is very good also. The whole team enjoys Sardines on toast and we feel strongly that more people should eat Sardines on toast.

I'll try a sweet toppings poll first, but I think I know the outcome already.

Big Woos for the icon fest nature of this message

Nick Parker
Nicey replies: Hey Nick,

The Choco Liebniz is of course the chocolate version of the Leibniz, just as the Chocolate Digestive is the chocolate version of the Digestive, and the Petit Écolier (small school boy) is the chocolate version of Petit Beurre. Slight loss of plot by the French again. Originally, 1890 something, Bahlsen produced 'Leibniz Kaks' and then changed the name to 'Leibniz Cakes', which sound even more tempting. I'm told by Bahlsen that the Choco Leibniz enjoys a fierce brand loyalty, which would seem about right as it is an impressive use of chocolate to dress up an otherwise uneventful biscuit, much as the Lu have done with the Petit Beurre. Of course the master stroke is to make the chocolate something that can be nibbled off.